About bunnyhopscotch

Ph.D is done, Lucy and I are still flipping pages of imagination, making splotches, humming in and out of tune, dancing around polyrhythmic-chromatic-pandiatonic mental fires, flying and falling, meandering in and out of discombobulation, gazing at pulchritude, picking up sound waves, stroking, caressing, embracing and learning new ways to see. An amazing lifelong journey - What more could anyone wish for?

mommy dearest

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Eat this, darling, it’s good for your Autism!

Why are so many autistic adults upset about and with “Autism Moms”? Why do so many autistic adults (myself included) seem to speak so ‘harshly’ against Autism Moms? And why are so many autistic adults broken, devastated, crushed, traumatised and yes, suicidal?

It is a collective hurt, a cultural pain and trauma suffered by the Autistic Community, that is embedded deeply inside our Being. No other group of disabled persons in recent years has been subjected to such forceful and sometimes even well orchestrated multi-dimensional assault, exploitation, misrepresentation, patronising condescension and stigma as Autistics.  Everyone is an expert on Autism, except the Actually Autistic. Continue reading

describing torment

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clement juxtapositions

Dogs are amazing creatures. Their ability to adjust, accommodate and survive never ceases to intrigue me. Too often, despite trauma and abuse, dogs nevertheless seem able to rise to pulchritudinous grace, something which I long to be able to learn and adapt to my own fragile humanity.

Here is something I wrote this day three years ago, describing in words – though most inadequate – what sensory overload is like in the midst of trying to live and survive inside normative-dictated frameworks and prescriptions. There is sadly very little ‘clement space’ for the autistic entity inside this overwhelming overstimulating normative world – well, almost none at all.


 

13 November 2015 at 18:38 Continue reading

“For the first time, I felt like I belong” – Reflections on the NAS Women and Girls Conference

So much here to think about.

Mind the Flap

…Well. Where do I start?!

Earlier this week, Sam Ahern and I were lucky enough to attend the National Autistic Society Women and Girls Conference 2018 to talk about Are You Autistic?, misconceptions about autism and our general realities as autistic women. More importantly, I got to meet dozens of brilliant autistic women and others in the autism community (and put faces to lots of usernames!), share stories and strategies, be part of a massive conversation online and offline, and learn so much more than I could have expected. Here’s an attempt to sum up some of my initial takeaways from the event:

Anxiety is a huge part of our lives – and it really doesn’t have to be

Emily Swiatek, employment training consultant at NAS, provides a simple but effective description of anxiety: “In our heads, a little lizard brain still thinks a T-Rex is coming to eat…

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Autistic Thriving @TEDx Pickering

 

“Autistic Thriving” – Dawn-joy Leong & Lucy Like-a-Charm. (Captions available on Youtube – please turn on cc option.)

Apologies for not posting this earlier.

“Just what you being made ‘aware’ of? And where are the Actually Autistic voices in this grand cacophony of opinions and interpretations?”

ingannation

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ingannation
(IN-gah-NAY-shun)
Noun:
-A cheat, trick or clever deception.
-The act of making someone believe something that is not true.
-The act of deceiving someone.
-The fact or condition of being deceived.
-Something that deceives.
-An act or statement intended to make people believe a falsehood.

Archaic – origin unknown.


 

I promised my good friend Rick that I’d make good use of this word. So, here is my take on the old, obsolete word, now démodé.

I’ve been thinking about lies and deception today. What is the most prominent, most soul crushing feature of my recent journey that focuses so much on advocacy? Ingannation. Continue reading

awful spectacle

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I posted this in my Official Facebook Page on Friday. It was a reflex reaction to having viewed two terribly humiliating and degrading videos of a young autistic child having a meltdown, recorded and uploaded to one of the many Autism Parenting Support groups in Facebook, by one of the many self-styled Autism Mom Guru types. Continue reading

special

THIS VIDEO! Yes! I couldn’t have said it better.

I cringe at the term “special needs”. It has never settled comfortably in my mindscape. Whenever the normative world employs this term, it has always felt like a tiny slap in the face, imperceptible to the “not special” people who view themselves as “more special because not disabled”. Calling us “special” in that way gives the normative a kind of authority, a Colonial power, over the “special people with special needs”.

At the age of 53, with a PhD that won the very highest award given to only one top candidate a year, I am still met with saccharine condescension whenever I reveal the already widely known fact that I am autistic. Continue reading

Giving is getting: the social ‘cure’ for autism (the power dynamics exposed).

If you read only one thing this weekend, read this!

“The truth is that the current neurological hegemony practices daily micro-aggressions in which autistic people are not welcomed. They’re also barred from giving in the mainstream of life.

Some of us experience just enough welcome (important to acknowledge a relative privilege) and gain the tools with which to carve a niche. But too many don’t. Every human needs a baseline of welcome, and access to the power of giving.”

The other side

Sonia Boué, artist performance image. Sonia Boué – process image for a forthcoming performance piece.

I acknowledge my privilege – I am enabled to give in my art practice. How many autistics are excluded? Process image for a forthcoming performance piece. 

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Giving is getting.

Yes – I’m talking power dynamics and socially embedded disadvantage.

My thoughts flow from a series of encounters.  Most notably a comment about ‘functional’ language in autism. Neuro-normative culture misinterprets autistic expression.  It tends to frame what is considered  ‘functional’ through the lens of its own (culturally dominant) social orientation.

Dominant cultures tend to make pathology of what they perceive as ‘other’. For example, not recognising language acquisition on its own (collecting and repeating words) as functional because it seems to serve no obvious ‘social’ purpose.

Neuro-normative hegemony has it that a child of a certain age ‘should’ talk about their day, their friends, and so on.  Within this framework of understanding, building…

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watery graves

Slow streams of unconscious

Melting rubberbands

River of tiredness

Drying up the sand

Strength seeping

Knees weeping

Purple cobalt

Orange ochre

Sunlight making way

For bland leaden grey

And time runs down sink holes

To swirling watery graves

When even fragmented words in poetic paintings fail, music – that wordless communication of the soul and spirit – overtakes.